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Acupuncture

Facial Rejuvenation with Cosmetic Acupuncture

Facial Rejuvenation with Cosmetic Acupuncture

There are countless articles and research papers on the benefits of acupuncture, but did you know that it can also be used to combat the signs of aging? A natural alternative to surgery or Botox, facial acupuncture is merely an extension of traditional acupuncture and Chinese medicine philosophy. 

Unlike an injection of Botox or some other filler, facial acupuncture addresses not just the signs of aging like fine lines and wrinkles but it also helps to restore your skin’s overall health. Now, you might be worried about acupuncture needles placed in your face, but acupuncture is safe and effective and is recognized by the World Health Organization and there are established guidelines for practice just like any other health profession. Practitioners are also licensed by their state’s department of health so you can be confident that you are in good hands.  continue reading »

Can Acupuncture Help with Depression?

Can Acupuncture Help with Depression?

As mental health issues have come to the forefront in recent years, many have sought more natural treatment options that don’t involve pharmaceuticals and their potentially harmful effects. Acupuncture has become a popular option for treating mental health issues, including depression. But does it work? Before we answer that question, let’s give a proper definition to both acupuncture and depression. continue reading »

How To Feel Your Best This Spring

 

Spring is the season of growth, regeneration, increased activity, and new beginnings. The transition from winter to spring can allow us the ability to get more done and spend more time outside. Generally, spring is regarded as a happy season, especially for those living in places with colder, darker winters. Most of us look forward to the spring’s warmer weather and longer days. As everything around us blossoms in the sun, so too should we embrace this renewal.

As with any seasonal change, we must pay close attention to our body’s needs during this turbulent time of seasonal change. Moving from the indoor sleepy coldness of winter and into the warm, active spirit of spring can be tough on your system when not handled with care. For many, spring months also bring allergies, high blood pressure, headaches, sinus pain, congestion, anger, irritation, and tendon problems. Many of these problems can be attributed to increased wind in the environment. And while there is nothing that can be done about external weather factors, internal wind can be addressed and diminished using Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and the many modalities it incorporates.

Chinese Medicine places emphasis on living in tune with the seasons. TCM theory divides the year into five seasons! These five seasons each have associations and physical qualities that can be seen in both the external or “natural” world and also within our bodies. These elements interact daily, creating balance and harmony — or stirring up chaos within the body.

TCM associates spring with the liver and gallbladder. The gallbladder governs decision-making and controls the sinews of the body, while the liver is in charge of detoxification and keeping the energy or Qi (pronounced “chee”) flowing smoothly. The liver tends to be a bit of a “bully” for many people, overwhelming bodily systems, so it’s important to keep it healthy. Often, winter months leave us with stagnant feelings in areas like relationships, work, and in our bodies. If we experience frustration, physical pain, or sadness, it may be a sign that energy is not flowing optimally. The liver and gallbladder are also related to the tendons, storing blood during periods of rest and releasing it to the tendons during times of activity. Because this pair of organs are responsible for the smooth flow of Qi and blood throughout the body, our daily activities should reflect this.

6 Ways to Rebalance Your Liver and Gallbladder

Stretch daily. Regular stretching is a great way to start and end the day. Adding yoga or tai chi to your daily routine can be very beneficial for the liver, tendons, and the body as a whole.

Get outside. Spending more time outside is another easy and powerful way to strengthen the liver and gallbladder energies in the spring. Moving around outside can get your heart rate up and keep you warm — if the temperature is still quite cold where you live, consider a warm-up exercise routine for inside before you brave the cold. Remember to dress in layers, wear boots instead of gym shoes, wear a warm hat, gloves, and socks, and, most importantly, protect your neck with a nice warm scarf.

For people with kids and families, getting outside is an excellent way to stay healthy and have fun together. Consider a walk with the dog, visiting a new park, playing basketball, soccer, rollerblading, biking, or even a good old game of frisbee with your family and kids. If you live in a wintery area, you might even seek out a local ice rink! In fact, at a moderate pace simply skating laps can burn up to 500 calories per hour while toning the muscles in your lower body and core that keep you mobile and limber. If ice skating sounds too cold for you, a bunded-up bike ride is another favorite spring activity. Because of its cardiovascular nature and use of the big quadriceps and gluteal muscles, biking will warm your body quickly.

Eat more greens. Eating fresh leafy greens is supportive of the liver’s detoxification function and can also help strengthen vision, thanks to the vitamins and nutrients in these veggies. And luckily, fresh greens are abundantly available in springtime!

Understand the elements. In TCM spring is associated with the element of wood. When a person is completely balanced, transitioning from one season to another doesn’t feel like a big deal. However, knowing what elemental type you are can be beneficial in determining how you will react to each passing season. For instance, a person who has a wood element constitution may experience anger during the spring. This is because the wood element is already closely associated with the emotion of anger and spring brings added stimuli that can trigger bits of rage.

Avoid overstimulation. It is also recommended to avoid excessive stimulants during the spring months. Things like coffee and caffeine supplements are considered expansive and energizing, which can be somewhat helpful during the cold winter months. However, during the spring, when life is abounding, excess energy can actually become harmful to the body. Symptoms can manifest themselves as headaches, insomnia, anger, and more.

Get your seasonal tune-up. To keep the liver and gallbladder working smoothly, things like acupuncture, herbal formulas, nutritional counseling can make a world of difference. Acupuncture can balance the body as it reacts to the changes in the weather and activity levels. Regular acupuncture treatments have also been shown to boost immunity. Spring can also cause flare-ups associated with seasonal allergies and acupuncture treatments can help with the inflammation, sneezing, runny nose, chest congestion, and watery eyes that accompany the allergic reactions. But most of all, acupuncture can help regulate those emotional imbalances that are often common during this transitional period.

As with any health care regiment, always be sure to seek out a fully licensed and properly trained professional, such as myself and my colleagues. By incorporating some simple practices into your life, you may just have a more enjoyable metamorphosis from winter into spring. If you need a little motivation to ease the transition, don’t hesitate to give us a call to schedule your next appointment.  410-984-3700.   https://East2WestMedicine.com

6 Ways to Stay Mentally Strong

6 Ways to Stay Mentally Strong

Just as we develop our physical muscles to gain strength and maintain our health, we also need to pay attention to strengthening our mental muscles. Learning to develop mental strength can help in many ways from overcoming challenging situations, to learning from and bouncing back from failure to viewing these challenges as opportunities for growth. Read on for six healthy habits you can develop to maintain your mental strength.  continue reading »

What is Traditional Chinese Acupuncture?

Acupuncture Model 

What Is Traditional Chinese Acupuncture?

Traditional Acupuncture is directed toward good health, vitality, balance, longevity, and alleviation of stress.  Acupuncture is an ancient approach, which addresses modern concerns and is effective in treating a wide range of health challenges. It has been proven effective over thousands of years and, although Chinese medicine and Western medicine are different, they complement each other.

How does Acupuncture work?

Life energy, Chi, courses through the body in channels similar to rivers that course through the earth.   When chi is full and flowing smoothly, life shows up as peaceful and joyful and we are strong and healthy.  When chi becomes “stuck”, illness can begin.  Even everyday stresses like deadlines, carpools and disappointments can lead to symptoms.  Rather than treat the symptoms, Acupuncture is able to reach the underlying imbalances.

You can benefit from acupuncture if you:

*Have chronic symptoms or illnesses, whether physical, mental, or emotional in nature

*Do not feel that you are functioning optimally, with energy and zest

*Have a lifestyle which places great demand on your vitality

*Get sick or feel tired frequently

*Are unable to sleep peacefully and wake rested

*Find your relationships unsatisfying and/or without harmony

*Lack a sense of balance in your life

*Want to clear up underlying causes for illness

*Want to prevent and  treat illness and disharmony                                                                                                        

What happens during an Acupuncture treatment?

Your acupuncture practitioner will take a detailed health history, will listen closely to why you have arrived for treatment and will observe you closely.  You will be asked to get comfortable and the acupuncturist will take several pulses.  These pulses give information about how the chi is flowing in your body.  After specific points are chosen, extremely thin needles are gently inserted just below the surface of the skin.  The sensation of the needle varies from no feeling at all to a slight ache or twinge.  The needles are disposable and the thickness of a human hair, so even people with a fear of hypodermic needles are able to relax with their use.  Usually only a few needles are used during each treatment, and most people report a deep sense of peacefulness during and after their treatments.

For more information or to set up an appointment, call Jean at 410-984-3700

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