Skip to content

Insomnia

Journey of Personal Growth and Renewal?

Are You Ready to Embark on a Journey of Personal Growth and Renewal?                 Look no further than Jean Donati Acupuncture!

Here, we don’t just offer acupuncture treatments; we provide opportunities for transformation and rejuvenation of the Body, Mind, and Spirit.

Jean Donati, our experienced practitioner, understands that true healing goes beyond merely addressing physical symptoms. It’s about nurturing your entire being—mind, body, and spirit—to promote holistic wellness and empower you to take charge of your life’s direction.

True Healing is about nurturing your mind, body, and spirit to promote holistic wellness, and empowering you to take charge of your life!

So, where are you headed, and how do you plan to get there?

Here’s what sets us apart and what you can expect when you choose Jean Donati Acupuncture:

  1. Personalized Care: We don’t believe in a one-size-fits-all approach. Each acupuncture session is tailored to meet your unique needs and goals. Whether you’re seeking relief from pain, stress reduction, or support for a specific health condition, we’ll design a treatment plan just for you, addressing not only your physical ailments but also your emotional and spiritual well-being.
  2. Holistic Approach: We treat the whole person, not just the symptoms. Alongside acupuncture, we offer complementary therapies such as facial rejuvenation, cupping, and lifestyle counseling to support your journey to optimal health and vitality. Our aim is to help your body tap into its innate ability to heal itself and promote overall wellness.
  3. Empowering Experience: At Jean Donati Acupuncture, you’ll find a supportive and nurturing environment where you’ll feel heard, valued, and encouraged every step of the way. We believe in compassionate care and genuine connection. Our clinic is a safe space where you can explore your healing journey, empowered to rediscover your natural capacity for wellness.
  4. Results-Driven Practice: Our ultimate goal is to help you achieve tangible results and lasting improvements in your health and well-being. Whether you’re seeking relief from chronic pain, improved sleep, or enhanced emotional balance, we’re committed to supporting you on your path to wellness.

Don’t wait any longer to invest in your health and well-being. Join us at Jean Donati Acupuncture and experience the transformative power of acupuncture and holistic healing. Take the first step towards a healthier, more vibrant life—schedule your appointment today!

 

Author: Jean Donati PA-C, M.Ac, L.Ac. 

Jean Donati is a Nationally Certified Physician Assistant, Licensed Acupuncturist and owner of Jean Donati Acupuncture.  She specializes in Traditional Five Element Acupuncture, and Facial Rejuvenation for physical, mental and emotional concerns.

2023 Year of the Yin Water Rabbit


 2023 is the Year of the Rabbit

The Rabbit year is yin: meditative and internal.  The contemplative (Yin) year of the Rabbit follows active (Yang) year of the Tiger.  This is the time to create peace, calm and rest after the Yang Tiger year of 2022.  The rabbit ‘s personality traits are friendliness, diplomacy, sensitivity and adaptability.  The rabbit excels in the healing arts and is drawn to creativity.  The focus is on adaptability—creating health and maintaining balance.  This is the year to focus on your creativity and focus on transforming your health while offering assistance to others.  This year of the rabbit represents longevity, hope and prosperity.2023 is also a Water year. 

In Chinese Medicine, the Water Element corresponds to the Kidney and Bladder meridians or pathways of energy.  It is the Winter season.  The Winter season is cool and dark.  The Water element represents your deep reserves of energy.   Consider how you are using, building or preserving your energy for the upcoming seasons.   This is the time to see an acupuncturist about Water and Kidney balance. This is especially important if you have issues corresponding to the Water pathway such as urinary concerns, sleep issues, dreams or concerns with hearing, and back, neck or knee pain.

There is a connection between the Water element and the color black or blue in Five Element Acupuncture.  Foods associated with this Water season include black foods such as black beans, black rice, and mushrooms.  These are recommended to balance the Water element. The Rabbit and Water both symbolize prosperity.  So you can anticipate this year to bring financial prosperity and professional success.  It is a year to both work hard to peruse your desires as well as to learn to create health and relaxation.

Happy Winter Solstice–Water Element

Cabin in the woods

We are now in the midst of Winter.  The season is cold, dark, and quiet.  Winter is for us, as for all of nature, a time on internal work: meditation, containment, concentration, and storing our energy.  We use this season for rest, and for the replenishing of our reserves, gathering strength for the year ahead.  Like the seed that cannot sprout until it has gathered sufficient strength, our ideas and plans cannot manifest if our energy is dispersed or drained.

In Chinese medicine, the element associated with Winter is Water.  Let us talk a little about water and its associations.  Water can take on many different qualities in nature.  It can take the form of a stagnant pond, or powerful rapids.  It can be a smooth flowing stream, or water raging out of control.  The water element can show up like this in all of us.  When our water energy is balanced, we are a calm lake or stream.  Our energy is moving, neither stagnant or overflowing.  When we are out of balance, we may become a flooding river, or when immobilized with fear, a frozen creek.

The organs associated with winter are the kidney and bladder.  In Chinese medicine, when we talk about organs, we are talking about the energetic aspects of the organ in an individual, not about Western anatomy and physiology.  The kidney, in Chinese medicine, are the root of the life force energy or Qi.  The kidneys create the fire and warmth to sustain bodily functions and to provide energy to the other organs.  The bladder controls the expenditure of energy.  You can look at the kidney as being the the bank account, and the bladder as the ATM machine.  The acupuncture points along these pathways of energy can be used to fill the reserves and awaken that place within us where our real strength, courage and wisdom lie.

Abundant reserves within us give us the courage and strength of will.  When we lack these reserves, we may feel fearful.  In Chinese medicine, the emotion of fear is associated with the element of water and the season of winter.  The emotion of a distressed water element is fear of not having enough of what it takes to meet the challenges that lie ahead, fear of being unable to complete what we have envisioned, or fear of not being prepared for what we might have to face.  It is as if we do not have enough stored away to survive the winter.

How does an imbalanced water element show up in an individual?  In Chinese medicine, the individual is viewed on levels of the body, mind, and spirit.  Dis-ease often manifests on more than one level.  On a physical level, one may feel fatigued, lacking energy (the energetic bank account or ATM depleted).  Water also lubricates the body.  We are, after all, 85% water!  With lack of lubrication comes stiffness.  Do your bones or joints hurt more in winter?  Are you more anxious?  Thoughts, ideas, muscles and joints move easier when they are lubricated.

In terms of the mind and spirit, do you feel like you want to do things but you simply cannot?  That you seem to be stuck on the sofa with your mind saying “I should do this, or I should do that”, but you simply cannot get up enough energy to get it going?  Or maybe you seem to be going all the time—frantically moving from one thing to another –always running about but never truly getting much accomplished.

Within the energy of water lies our will, our ability to keep on keeping on.  So what can you do?  My number one advice is to remember to take time to relax completely for at least 30 minutes during the day.  This means to kick back, listen to music perhaps, but definitely relax your body and mind.

Acupuncture is not just for pain.  It addresses the underlying condition and is used to balance the whole person.  You cannot separate the body and the mind—balance one and you balance the other.  Emotional blocks can be moved and physical symptoms can be cleared as a person is brought back into healthy balance.  Just some of the areas that acupuncture addresses; the digestive, reproductive, immune and respiratory symptoms, anxiety, depression, that annoying “stuck” feeling and, of course, physical discomfort.

To maintain the fire of the kidney, a winter diet ideally would be warming and substantial with more whole grains, less fruit, and lots of steamed or baked vegetables, especially root vegetables.  Soup is a great addition to the diet during winter as it is easy on the digestive system and keeps our inner fire warm.  Warming herbs and spices like ginger, chili peppers and cinnamon are wonderful additions to your diet this time of year.

Exercise such as Tai Chi and Qi Gong are very good for inner balance, as they build strength, improve immune function and cultivate Qi (energy) through breathing, meditation and slow movements.  If you have lower back pain, you may find that rest, warm foods, and activities that support that support your inner balance may supplement your water energy and diminish your symptoms.  Remember, the kidneys and bladder are governed by water.  Give them all the help you can by drinking more water.

Finally, if you receive acupuncture, winter is a great time for a tune up.  If you do not receive acupuncture, winter is a great time to start building your reserves.

Acupuncture for Anxiety or Panic

Acupuncture and Acute Stress…Adrenalin and Acupuncture.

Jean_Donati_Acupuncture_PanicDid you ever have one of those days….You are sleeping soundly then all of the sudden you are awake.  You look at the clock, and…Oh NOOOooo…What happened to the alarm?  You wake up 15 minutes before you have to leave for work.   It is a pretty upsetting feeling.  You feel rushed and anxious. Am I going to get to work on time?  Your blood pressure is elevated, and you are aggrevated. You yell at the traffic for being slow. It upsets your body and your your energy for the entire day.

This happened to me this morning, so I would like to let you know you what is happening in your body, and what you can do to alleviate those rushed, anxious, and upsetting feelings.  First take a deep breath. What you are experiencing is normal. You woke up late and perhaps were startled.  Your nervous system has kicked in with adrenalin.

Adrenaline, also called epinephrine, is a hormone produced by your adrenal glands.  Adrenaline is known as the “fight or flight” hormone and is released in response to a stressful, exciting, or threatening situation.  Adrenaline enables your body to respond quickly to these situations by enabling the heart to beat faster, the blood-flow to increase to the brain and muscles and stimulates the body to make sugar to use as fuel.

When you experience an “adrenaline rush” there is a perception of a threat that sent to the amygdala, the part of the brain responsible for emotional processing.   This signal communicates to the rest of the body through the nervous system.  Symptoms include a boost of energy, rapid breathing, increased heartbeat, and perspiration.  This rapid process allows you to dodge out of harms way quickly and return to safety.  To assist with returning to equilibrium, it is important to allow the body to rest and repair itself.

Acupuncture along with deep breathing and meditation clearly benefits every aspect of the body and can return it to its normally calm state.  There are some acupuncture points to help you with an acute stress reaction or panic attack.  Gently massaging these points can help get you back on track and ease your symptoms and energy.

Shenmen (HT7), also called Spirit Gate, is one of the major points on the heart meridian or energy pathway.  Because it can nourish the blood, calm and cool down internal fire, it is a good point to calm the mind, clear the emotions and help with anxiety, stress, insomnia, agitation, and palpitations. Shenmen, is located at the wrist crease on the radial side of the arm, where your pinky finger is.

Neiguan (PC 6), also called Inner Frontier Gate, goes to the chest and opens it up.  It allows you to breathe easier, stops racing of the heart and palpitations.  It calms your spirit or “shen” and mind, so it is helpful for racing and fragmented thoughts.  It is also a great point to open the chest and the heart, counteracting the contracting energy of anxiety.  This point is also located on the inside of the forearm, about two inches down from the wrist crease, in the middle of the forearm between the two tendons. This point is also good for nausea which can accompany anxiety.

 

Tanzhong, (CV 17), also called Middle of Chest is a very calming point for the mind and heart.  It is helpful to calm the palpitations that come with anxiety.  It opens the chest and relaxes the diaphragm.  It is located in the center of the chest, on the median line just between the nipples at the 4th intercostal space.

 

 

Yongquan, (KD 1), also called Bubbling Spring, calms the mind and clears the brain.  It is a very grounding point for the body, mind and spirit.  Kidney 1 has a strong downward moving energy that helps settle the mind when someone is stuck in their head.    It connects us to the earth and gives us back out footing.  It is located on the sole of the foot approximately 1/3rd the way from toes in the depression when to toes are pointed.

 

So next time you are feeling stressed from whatever reason, remember these calming acupuncture points.  Massaging this points with mild pressure for 15-30 seconds (up to 3-5 minutes) can help reduce anxiety stress and panic and put you back into control.  Take the time to take care of your body mind and spirit.      Jean Donati Acupuncture is here to help ease your nervous system back into calm.  Give us a call 410-984-3700.

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Acupuncture

Words Post Traumatic Stress disorder

PTSD and Acupuncture

Those who have experienced trauma including, physical, emotional and sexual trauma can experience Post Traumatic Stress Disorder for months to years after the initial event.  Traumatic events can include physical events such as experiencing or witnessing a car accident or near-death experience, physical combat such as faced by veterans in war, and sexual trauma in the form of incest, rape or unwanted sexual encounters.  Individuals can carry the remnants of those events with them for a long time.  These remnants often continue to affect them in profound ways, disrupting their relationships, their overall mental health, and their daily lives.  Acupuncture is one of the modalities which can address the physical and emotional aftermath of traumatic events and assist on the path of healing.

 

What is PTSD?

PTSD is a physiological disorder that can result from being exposed to any traumatic event.  The disorder results in symptoms that can be different for each individual.

Possible symptoms include:

  • Some PTSD sufferers relive the traumatic event over and over. Flashbacks, memories, and nightmares are common.  Often, sounds, smells, and sights can trigger a flashback.
  • Avoidance is also common. Individuals with PTSD avoid people, places and events that remind them of the event.
  • Numbing is another self-preservation mechanism. Numbing can include difficulty expressing emotions, loss of interest in enjoyable activities, and the loss of memory of parts of the traumatic event.  Certain memories may resurface yeas after the event took place.  This is a common occurrence.
  • Arousal can be exhibited by anger, irritability, trouble concentrating or sleeping, feeling on guard and being easily startled or surprised.

The effects of post-traumatic stress disorder in someone’s life can be wide ranging.  An individual with PTSD may have feelings of hopelessness, shame and despair.  There may be problems at work.  Relationships may be strained.  Serious health conditions such as depression, anxiety and drug or alcohol abuse are not uncommon.  Other health issues include insomnia, stress, anxiety, depression, digestive disorders, anorexia, bulimia, difficulty with concentration and focus, and  headaches.

 

How Can I Help my Friend or Relative with PTSD?

There are many ways you can help your friend or relative with PTSD.

  • Learn everything you can about PTSD. Knowledge is power. The more you know about the disorder, the better you can understand what your friend is going through and why they are responding the way they are to specific triggers.
  • Offer your assistance. This may be going to physician visits with them, keeping track of medications, or going with them to therapy.  If your friend is learning new techniques to cope with stress try learn the new techniques with them.  Be supportive as possible.
  • Be available and fully present to listen. Listen with a compassionate open heart.  Don’t judge, argue, or problem-solve.  Your friend my not be willing or able to talk.  That is ok, just sitting with someone in silence may be what they need.
  • Plan fun activities to get them out and about. Be aware of events or environments that are difficult and plan events to be as stress-free as possible.
  • Pay attention to any comments about hurting themselves and report them to the therapist or doctor. If necessary, call 911.
  • Sometimes supporting someone with PTSD is challenging. Get support for yourself so you are able to help your friend or loved one.  Seek safety and help immediately if your friend or relative becomes violent or threatening.

PTSD Crisis Resources

If you or your loved one is in crisis:

  • Call 911.
  • Go to your nearest Emergency Room.
  • Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255).
  • Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline in Spanish/Español 1-888-628-9454.
  • Go to the veterans crisis website at https://www.veteranscrisisline.net/ to chat live with a crisis counselor at any time of day or night.
  • Call the National Sexual Assault Hotline at 1-800-656-4673 or chat online 24/7 at https://www.rainn.org/resources

There are many new treatments available for people who have experienced physical, emotional or sexual abuse, assault, and trauma.  Acupuncture can foster a safe environment for healing and growth.  Jean Donati Acupuncture has experience in treating patients with PTSD.  For more information, please call 410-984-3700 for a confidential discussion.

410-984-3700 Directions Contact/Schedule